Source of the famous “Eugenics Tree” image

The “eugenics tree” is one of the most reprinted images associated with the history of the subject. The source is Laughlin (1923: 15, figure 3). It was used at the Second International Congress of Eugenics (September 25-27, 1921), held at the American Museum of Natural History, New York City. The image was created for a certificate awarded “for meritorious… Read More »

Workshop and Wikithon May 2020 | First Call for Participation

For many decades, the history and legacy of eugenics have been subjects of investigation by historians and philosophers of science. In February 2020, University College London’s Commission of Inquiry to Investigate the History of Eugenics at UCL is due to report its findings. Experts in the history and philosophy of science community are in an important position to reflect… Read More »

Proceedings of the First International Eugenics Congress 1912, volume 1

The First International Eugenics Congress was held at the University of London, July 24th to 30th, 1912, and was organised by the Eugenics Education Society. Major Leonard Darwin was the president of the society and chair of the organising committee. The Congress published its proceedings. Volume 1 published papers communicated at the Congress. Volume 2 was a record of proceedings, including notes on… Read More »

Proceedings of the First International Eugenics Congress 1912, volume 2

The First International Eugenics Congress was held at the University of London, July 24th to 30th, 1912, and was organised by the Eugenics Education Society. Major Leonard Darwin was the president of the society and chair of the organising committee. The Congress published its proceedings. Volume 1 published papers communicated at the Congress. Volume 2 was a record of proceedings, including notes on… Read More »

Instructions for Contributing to “Legacies of Eugenics” Workshop 01 May 2020

Following our call for participation in a one-day workshop to digest and reflect upon the final report published by University College London’s Commission of Inquiry to Investigate the History of Eugenics at UCL, this page provides instructions for participation. These events are not part of the Inquiry’s work; they are part of a longer term Legacies of Eugenics project… Read More »

Speeches Delivered at a Dinner in Honour of Karl Pearson, 1934

Karl Pearson retired in 1933, aged 76. To honour his career, colleagues and former students gathered for a dinner in April 1934. On this occasion, Professor LNG Filon, Vice-Chancellor of University of London, gave a tribute to Pearson. This was followed by recollections from several long-time colleagues and the presentation of various gifts. Pearson gave a “reply” to… Read More »

Instructions for Contributing to “Legacies of Eugenics” Wikithon 02 May 2020

Following our call for participation in a one-day Wikithon (aka, an “edit-a-thon”) to improve Wikipedia resources associated with the history of eugenics at UCL and the history of eugenics across Britain, this page provides instructions for participation. This event is  intended to further the impact of the final report published by University College London’s Commission of Inquiry to Investigate… Read More »

First Announcement: May 2020 Workshop to Reflect on Inquiry’s “Final Report”

Professor Joe Cain has announced plans for a workshop for historians and philosophers of science to reflect upon the final report of University College London’s Commission of Inquiry into the History of Eugenics, due at the end of February 2020. This will take the form of a one-day meeting in London on 01 May 2020 and a one-day… Read More »

Farrall’s Classic Work on History of English Eugenics Is Republished

The history of eugenics in Britain is far from hidden or forgotten. Many excellent papers and books explore the role of individuals (e.g., Francis Galton, Karl Pearson, Ronald Fisher, and Leonard Darwin to name only a few of the men involved) and the role of organisations (e.g., Eugenics Education Society). Eugenics in Britain has been studied in depth… Read More »